Posts Tagged ‘Faulty sensory appreciation’

Seeing clearly takes stopping tot think

As ever, it’s stopping long enough to see that makes the difference. I’m sure I’m by no means the only one, but this morning I found myself reading something which actually meant quite the opposite to me of that which it really meant. Try as I might it made absolutely no sense whatsoever to me,…

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I am re-reading Michael J Gelb’s book “The Art of Connection” because I knew upon first reading that there is so much more to this book than meets the eye and read a sentence which I thought would be worth sharing here, “Feelings may be stimulated by the words or actions of others, but are…

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I wrote previously about a change that I wasn’t expecting to happen. I had attempted a variety of things to improve what I thought was wrong, to no avail, and eventually gave up trying, realising that this is not where the ‘problem’ actually lay. People tend to think that they don’t require Alexander Technique lessons,…

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When we take Alexander Technique lessons, often what the teacher is asking of us by means of their hands feels unfamiliar and unnatural to us, because it it against our habit, it feels all wrong, but FM Alexander writes about how such thinking is unreliable because it is based on feeling, not on reason.

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I’ve been reminding myself of one of the principles of the Alexander Technique, namely that of faulty sensory appreciation, which in a nutshell means that nine times out of ten what we think we’re doing, or indeed think we’re doing, may not actually the case and wrong for our purpose.We may think that it is,…

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